Board games based on video games: Licensors and game authors are increasingly following this trend. There are several games publishers who have long since opened the door to analog game worlds: Ubisoft dared, Konami and Capcom as well, Paradox Interactive several times, Blizzard recognized the trend many years ago. One question remains, however: where is Nintendo?

There's merchandise from Nintendo, toys - the Japanese publisher and cult developer recently crossed the blurring line between games and toys with Lego Super Mario and Mario Kart Live: Home Circuit - and there are also some board games. These are, however, offshoots of Monopoly, Connect Four and Co. The more serious representatives among the board games with a Nintendo license are Ravensburger's The Crazy Labyrinth or Level 8 - that is a clear sign. There are no “real” board games with Nintendo's heroines, but the time is ripe. Other publishers have already done this.

Puerto Rico: Animal Crossing or Blood Rage: Hyrule?

Publisher giants such as Ubisoft, Konami or Capcom have long recognized that the world of video games can be perfectly merged with the world of board games. The implementation of the tactical shooter Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Siege in the board game version “6: Siege - The Board Game” recently generated over one and a half million US dollars via crowdfunding via Kickstarter. The popular game company Mythic Games was responsible.

Capcom was even more successful as the licensor for Street Fighter: Miniatures Game, with which Jasco Games even collected around two million US dollars from supporters. The board games for Resident Evil were similarly successful - offshoots for parts 2 and 3 also each flushed over a million US dollars into the coffers of Steamforged Games. With a board game version of Capcom's Monster Hunter World, the British even made it to around 4,7 million US dollars. And also Horizon - Zero Dawn: The Board Game was extremely successful as a crowdfunding.

Dark Souls, Doom, Fallout, Bloodborne, God of War - the list goes on and on. Paradox Interactive has its strategic video games implemented, and now there is even Stardew Valley as a table game variant. It's hard to imagine what else might follow in the future. But you don't hear anything from Nintendo: Are the Japanese not interested in board games? Can't find the right partners for implementation? Do you want to guard the licenses? Or have you secretly already worked out plans for which the board game world is just not ready yet?

Zelda looks so sad, but she just wants to become the star of a board game. Image: Nintendo

Zelda looks so sad, but she just wants to become the star of a board game. Image: Nintendo

But it would be the Nintendo heroes around whom board games could be designed. Mario, Zelda, Link, Samus Aran, Bowser and Co - they could all find a place in one or the other analog game. Nintendo would also benefit from the foray into new worlds: with family board games, the publisher could strengthen its focus on family-friendly entertainment, while complex board games could appeal to new target groups.

A lot would be conceivable: An area control board game with a Zelda license? Conquering territories in Hyrule, moving troops, leading armies to victory with heroes like Link and villains like Ganondorf - all of this would be conceivable and probably entertaining. A kind of Rajas of The Ganges or Puerto Rico based on Animal Crossing? Excellent! Rallyman GT: Mario Kart? Players would probably pay huge sums for it. Even hybrid board games would be feasible. Think of Asmodees Descent: Legends of Darkness with app support - this board game in the world of Pokémon? One would buy!

Nintendo shouldn't have to fear failure: The board game studios are now so experienced in the implementation of licenses that only in rare cases does a project really go wrong. On the other hand, gamblers are generous with their money when it comes to supporting licensed games.

The market is there, as is the production technology - and the look of the board games can now be designed at least on a Nintendo Switch level. So: Nintendo, what are you waiting for?

In any case, there are more than enough approaches for Nintendo board games. If you still have ideas, you can leave them as a comment under the post. Maybe Nintendo just needs a nudge in the right direction?

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Last updated on 29.09.2022/XNUMX/XNUMX / Affiliate Links / Images from the Amazon Product Advertising API. * = Affiliate links. Images from Amazon PA API